Intel shows the 12th-generation Core processor codenamed Alder Lake

Intel shows the 12th-generation Core processor codenamed Alder Lake

Intel recently launched a number of new products at the International Consumer Electronics Show. At the same time, the company disclosed some information about the new Core processor in advance.

The new core processor is code-named Alder Lake, which is Intel’s 12th-generation Core processor. This series of processors will also be manufactured based on a 10-nanometer process.

The Alder Lake series covering both desktop and mobile platforms will debut in the second half of the year. In fact, the most important change in the new Core series is the use of a hybrid core architecture.

Intel calls it a major breakthrough in the x86 architecture, which significantly improves the overall performance of the processor through a single-chip integrated high-performance and high-efficiency hybrid architecture.

In the field of smartphones, ARM and other companies have launched a combined architecture of large cores and small cores, and now this architecture is also used by Intel on desktop platforms.

According to currently known information, Intel is mixing different processor cores. For example, the 12th generation Core may mix Cove cores and Atom cores.

The Cove core can provide standard high performance and the Atom core is smaller and more efficient. This combination can reduce overall power consumption and improve performance.

Intel has not clearly stated which generation of Cove/Atom cores will be used for such large and small cores. This may not be known until the product is released.

The company said that the 12th generation Core will be divided into a high-performance version and a high-efficiency version. Different versions of the core architecture can meet the needs of users in different scenarios.

At the same time, this series of processors will be manufactured based on the Intel 10nm SuperFin architecture and process, with more and faster transistors to increase the processor core frequency.

Via: CNET