The US Department of Commerce signs a temporary license to allow Huawei to send software updates to network devices within 90 days

Polan Huawei 5G

Brücke-Osteuropa [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Recently, the US Department of Commerce has signed a temporary license to allow Huawei to continue to purchase US-made products to maintain existing networks and provide software update services. After the United States listed Huawei as a list of regulated entities, it required US companies to stop cooperating with Huawei, including providing software or hardware to Huawei. This news is undoubtedly a huge injury, but Huawei also said that it can continue to operate under the pressure of the US government.

Polan Huawei 5G
Brücke-Osteuropa [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
A temporary license signed by the US Department of Commerce allows Huawei to re-purchase software licenses and hardware products from US businesses for a period of 90 days. However, the additional restriction regulations are that even if Huawei can re-purchase hardware and software products, it can only position its use to maintain existing network equipment and services. For example, Google regains access to Android updates and obtained the vulnerability patch in Google’s Android security update to make firmware fixes for Huawei devices.

There are also hardware and software from other vendors to maintain Huawei’s basic telecommunications equipment, including issuing software updates to fix vulnerabilities or repairing damaged equipment. However, the software and hardware products purchased under the Temporary License Regulations will be strictly regulated by the US Department of Commerce. Huawei must not use software and hardware to manufacture new products.

US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross issued a statement saying that the new temporary license is designed to allow telecom operators that rely on Huawei equipment to have time to re-arrange. In short, the new temporary license will enable existing Huawei’s Android device users to continue to use and continue to operate the broadband network that relies on Huawei devices.

Former US Commerce Secretary Kevin Wolf said the Ministry of Commerce’s temporary ban seems to be aimed at preventing the collapse of the Internet, computers and smartphone systems. Of course, the new temporary license also highlights the fact that changes in Huawei supply chain system can have direct, far-reaching and unexpected consequences for US customers.

Via: Reuters