Mon. Nov 11th, 2019

Tor Browser 9.0.1 released: based on Firefox ESR68

2 min read

Why do you use Tor?

Protect their privacy from unscrupulous marketers and identity thieves.

Internet Service Providers (ISPs) sell your Internet browsing records to marketers or anyone else willing to pay for it. ISPs typically say that they anonymize the data by not providing personally identifiable information, but this has proven incorrect. A full record of every site you visit, the text of every search you perform, and potentially userid and even password information can still be part of this data. In addition to your ISP, the websites (and search engines) you visit have their own logs, containing the same or more information.

Protect their communications from irresponsible corporations.

All over the Internet, Tor is being recommended to people newly concerned about their privacy in the face of increasing breaches and betrayals of private data. From lost backup tapes to giving away the data to researchers, your data is often not well protected by those you are supposed to trust to keep it safe.

Protect their children online.

You’ve told your kids they shouldn’t share personally identifying information online, but they may be sharing their location simply by not concealing their IP address. Increasingly, IP addresses can be literally mapped to a city or even street location and can reveal other information about how you are connecting to the Internet. In the United States, the government is pushing to make this mapping increasingly precise.

Research sensitive topics

There’s a wealth of information available online. But perhaps in your country, access to information on AIDS, birth control, Tibetan culture, or world religions is behind a national firewall.

Skirt surveillance

Even harmless web browsing can sometimes raise red flags for suspicious observers. Using Tor protects your privacy by making it extremely difficult for an observer to correlate the sites you visit with your physical-world identity.

Circumvent censorship

If you live in a country that has ever blocked Facebook or Youtube, you might need to use Tor to get basic internet functionality.

Tor Browser 9.0.1 has been released.

Changelog

The full changelog since Tor Browser 9.0a8 is:

  • All Platforms
    • Update NoScript to 11.0.4
      • Bug 21004: Don’t block JavaScript on onion services on medium security
      • Bug 27307: NoScript marks HTTP onions as not secure
    • Bug 30783: Fundraising banner for EOY 2019 campain
    • Bug 32321: Don’t ping Mozilla for Man-in-the-Middle-detection
    • Bug 27268: Preferences clean-up
  • Windows + OS X + Linux
    • Update Tor Launcher to 0.2.20.2
      • Bug 32164: Trim each received log line from tor
      • Translations update
    • Bug 31803: Replaced about:debugging logo with flat version
    • Bug 31764: Fix for error when navigating via ‘Paste and go’
    • Bug 32169: Fix TB9 Wikipedia address bar search
    • Bug 32210: Hide the tor pane when using a system tor
    • Bug 31658: Use builtin –panel-disabled-color for security level text
    • Bug 32188: Fix localization on about:preferences#tor
    • Bug 32184: Red dot is shown while downloading an update
  • Android
    • Bug 32342: Crash when changing the browser locale

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